New Fiction Published!

Happy to share that “You Should Have the Body,” a new fiction of mine, has just been published at Web Conjunctions! Thanks, Bradford Morrow, Micaela Morrissette, and everyone at the journal!

Interview with Amber Sparks

Check out my interview with Amber Sparks, where I ask her about her new collection, The Unfinished World and Other Stories, and other things. Here’s an excerpt:

[Madera]: The stories here run the fabulist fiction gamut. You explore myth, science fiction, legend, horror, the fairy tale, etc., upending their tropes, often subtextually critiquing them. And sometimes you comment directly on genre conventions. For instance, in “The Cemetery for Lost Faces” we find an argument about what constitutes a fairy tale, some characters arguing that the “happily-ever-after is just a false front. It hides the hungry darkness inside.” What would you say motivates you to play with genre, to trespass their seeming borders? And how would you describe the “hungry darkness inside”?

Sparks: Honestly, most of it is a love for genre fiction, film, and television. The things that got me passionate about reading and writing, the things that I took the first story shapes and tropes from, were almost entirely genre: horror, sci-fi, fantasy, fairy tale. The first books I ever read were books of fairy tales my dad had from his own childhood. So I’ve been forming stories around these traditional structures and genre conventions forever, and playing with those conventions, upending them, for almost just as long. I wouldn’t say there’s an overt motivation beyond playfulness, between thinking always of ways to expand the possibilities of story. But I think if I’m being honest, feminism and an interest in outsider art, in fringe stories, probably also play a role, because there’s so much to be said about the role of women in these traditional stories and in stories outside of the traditional literary space.

Read the rest HERE.

New Fiction Forthcoming!

Happy to share that one of my fictions, “You Should Have the Body,” is forthcoming in Web Conjunctions. Thanks to the good Bradford Morrow, Micaela Morrissette, and everyone at the journal. Read dangerously, indeed.

Ear’s Mouth Must Move: Essential Interviews of William H. Gass

tumblr_inline_n6t9u5Cp6X1qa8s7nHappy to have my interview included in The Ear’s Mouth Must Move — Essential Interviews of William H. Gass, edited by Stephen Schenkenberg, alongside heavyweights like John Gardner, Thomas LeClair, and KCRW’s Bookworm‘s Michael Silverblatt, not to mention Magister Gass, himself. Apparently, my interview, “Sentenced to Depth,” is a 94-minute read.
Schenkenberg writes:
Free to all and readable on any device, the microsite collects 13 essential interviews that Gass gave between the late 1970s and 2013. It’s titled The Ear’s Mouth Must Move, a phrase of Gass’ own. The pieces feature text, related historical photography, video, and a handful of marginal notes and links that might be of interest to readers.

New Fiction Forthcoming!

Vacancies

Happy to share that one of my fictions, “To Have Done with the Division of Moving Bodies,” will be published in VACANCIES, Heavy Feather Review‘s upcoming double-issue.

Thanks, Jason Teal and Nathan Floom!

New Interview with Lance Olsen

An excerpt from the interview:

John Madera: Would you talk more about this “webbing” that connects everything with everything, about reality as a text?

Lance Olsen: Maybe our real job as writers, I sometimes want to say, perhaps even as human beings (with the accent on the plural noun), is to continuously learn to pay attention to the world we move through. Yet the world—which is to say how we’re wired—plots against us. Our default mode of being often wants to be the habitual, which is to say the unexamined, which is to say our default mode of being-there wants to be not-being-there.

What’s astonishing and invigorating for me about what I consider difficult art—a sentence, say, in Ben Marcus’s Age of Wire and String or Gary Lutz’s Stories in the Worst Way; the architectonics of David Lynch’s Lost Highway; the complexity of any two seconds of a text-film by Young-Hai Chang or corner of Hieronymus Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights—is that it seeks to return us through challenge to attention, which is to say contemplation.

Another way of putting this is to move from the aesthetic to the existential and think about what your answer might be to Annie Dillard’s rattling riddle: “Assume you write for an audience consisting solely of terminal patients. That is, after all, the case. What could you say to a dying person that would not enrage by its triviality?”

In other words—and this eases us toward a tentative answer to your second question about reality’s textuality—paying attention is a continuous condition of learning (and unlearning) how to read. The world is nothing if not a text composed of a multitude of texts (just as each of us is nothing if not a text composed of a multitude of texts) we try to make sense of, narrate, and, as Derrida reminds us, there is nothing outside the text.

But here’s the deep-structure dilemma: humans are by nature story generators, pattern recognition machines, designed to tell what the world has done to them. Give us an incident, no matter how enigmatic, indeterminate, or tenuous its causes, and we will narrate in order to generate the hopeful, desperate impression of coherence. We are built to strong-arm links, invent causal chains that don’t exist. Give us a bedlam of stars and we’ll birth Sagittarius. This instinct is what Nassim Nicholas Taleb refers to as the narrative fallacy—that common intellectual blunder of forcing chaos into cosmos in an attempt to account for what eventuates around us and to us and through us.

Find the rest HERE.

New Fiction in Conjunctions:60, In Absentia!

conj60bOne of my fictions, “Suspension as a Unit of Experience; or, What She Remembered of the Vanishing Lines,” has just been published in Conjunctions:60, In Absentia.

Happy to have some of my fiction alongside work by Joyce Carol Oates, Robert Coover, Brian Evenson, Robert Olen Butler, Miranda Mellis, Joanna Ruocco, Stephen O’Connor, J. W. McCormack, Gabriel Blackwell, Matt Bell, Benjamin Hale, Kim Chinquee, Julia Elliott, Carole Maso, Charles Bernstein, Robert Walser, and others.

Thanks, Bradford Morrow and everyone at Conjunctions!